Connect with us

HEALTH

Identifying The First Symptoms Of A Brain Tumour

Published

on

Identifying The First Symptoms Of A Brain Tumour

In simple terms, a brain tumour is a growth within the brain and it shouldn’t be there. While research is ongoing to identify what causes brain tumours and how to prevent them, early diagnosis is essential to increase your likelihood of survival.

It is worth noting that approximately 2,000 people are diagnosed in Australia every year with a malignant brain tumour. That’s the more aggressive and dangerous type, such as brain cancer. Of these, approximately 1,500 die.

While early diagnosis and a visit to a good neurosurgeon is essential to increase your chances of survival. You should note that how fast a brain tumour grows can vary greatly. It depends on the type of tumour, where it is, and your metabolism.

There are a variety of signs that you may have a brain tumour. If you’re experiencing the following you’ll want to see a specialist as soon as possible. However, don’t panic, a brain tumour is only one answer, these symptoms can point to other issues.

  • Headaches

If you start getting regular headaches and don’t usually suffer from these, or if your usual headache pattern changes, you may have a brain tumour: especially if they are a lot worse than usual.

  • Vision Problems

Combine the headaches with vision issues and you’re increasing the likelihood of a brain tumour. The most common vision problems are double vision or blurred vision. You can also lose your peripheral vision.

  • Balancing issues

If your brain isn’t functioning normally due to abnormal cells creating pressure it can result in difficulty balancing. This can be compounded by difficult hearing things you normally can.

  • Difficulty with speech

Equally, pressure on your brain can distort the connections with other parts of your body, including the area that controls speech. This complication does depend on where the tumour is but if you suddenly notice you’re struggling to form the right words and sentences you may have a brain tumour.

  • Fatigue & confusion

As your brain is under pressure and your body finds it more difficult to complete everyday tasks, it’s highly likely that you’ll start to feel tired a lot of the time. Confusion is also common as you may struggle to identify where you are, what you were doing, or deal with other everyday events. 

  • Behavioural changes

Your brain is the centre of who you are. If it is struggling or experiencing pressure that prevents it from working properly, you are likely to behave and react differently. These behavioural and personality changes may be more noticeable to others first. It’s important to get these checked out as soon as possible as there can be many causes.

  • Seizures

These generally happen as the tumour grows and starts to cut off blood supply to parts of the brain. A seizure is frightening and a warning that your brain is struggling.

If you’re experiencing the above symptoms it is important to get help as soon as possible. It will help to understand what is wrong with you and you can go through the treatment options.

HEALTH

How To Improve Your Dental Health In Your 50s

Published

on

How To Improve Your Dental Health In Your 50s

As you get older, your mouth ages and gets drier, increasing the chances of developing some of the most common dental health diseases. This is why many dentists recommend you take great care of your oral health in your younger years to keep them in optimal condition.

If you’re in your 50s, you’ll need to pay more attention to your mouth. This is because you’re at a higher risk of developing several dental health issues at this age. Most people in their 50s face tooth decay, loss, and darkening. Gum disease, bad breath, and dental-related illnesses like oral cancer are common for people aged 50 and over.

That said, there are several ways to improve your dental health in your 50s. Here are some tips:

  1. Consider Implants Or Dentures

It’s common to have one or more missing teeth at 50. If you don’t get implants or dentures, you may find the surrounding teeth naturally shifting to fill the left gap. Your jawbone might  become weaker or degrade, making healthy teeth loose, and you may look older than you are.

If you have missing teeth, consult your dentist to prevent the above issues. They’ll explain the differences in dentures and implants and identify what suits you.

  • Brush Daily

Daily brushing can improve your dental health. If you’ve done this for most of your life, don’t stop doing it as you age. It’ll help you prevent plaque and bacteria buildup, leading to tooth decay, gum disease, and bad breath.

However, in your 50s, your gums and teeth have undergone significant wear and tear. It’ll be best to be gentler. Consider switching to a soft-bristled toothbrush, and don’t apply too much pressure when cleaning your teeth. This will prevent further wear and tear.

If you experience joint pain or have arthritis, normal brushing may be challenging. Thus, buy an electric toothbrush. It’ll make things much easier and even help you clean the difficult-to-reach areas, protecting your oral health better.

Since you’re at a higher risk of oral health issues, brushing your teeth after every meal is best. This is contrary to brushing twice a day as you were used to, but it enhances your oral health better at age 50 and above.

  • Keep Flossing

Brushing may not eliminate all food particles or plaque from your teeth and gumline. This is because your toothbrush can’t sufficiently reach deep between your teeth to remove all unwanted substances. Flossing can help you eliminate food debris and plaque more sufficiently, lowering the risk of tooth decay, cavities, and gum disease.

When flossing, you need to make some adjustments. You should apply minimum pressure to prevent excessive wear and tear of your gums. Since bacteria and plaque are likely to accumulate much quicker at this age, you’ll need to floss more frequently. So rather than doing it twice a day like you were used to, consider flossing after every meal. It may help first to floss and then brush. This way, you’ll loosen all food particles and plaque, then get rid of them with brushing rather than leaving them in the mouth.

If you have arthritis, experience joint pain, or find it challenging to perform simple tasks, a hand-held flosser is better. It’ll make things easier and allow you to apply minimum pressure on your gums. Your dentist can also recommend other suitable options.

  • Go For Regular Check-ups

Regular dental check-ups are also essential in enhancing oral health at age 50 and beyond. This way, your dentist will identify and treat any potential problems early. They’ll thoroughly clean your teeth and gums, promoting good health. They may also recommend cosmetic procedures that could benefit you, like teeth whitening and dental bonding.

  • Drink More Water

Your teeth normally go through demineralization—losing minerals—every day because of what you eat and drink. Saliva contains phosphate and calcium, which helps with remineralization—natural teeth repair process that replaces lost minerals to keep teeth strong and prevent tooth decay. Saliva also covers your teeth, protecting them against bacteria that may lead to cavities and gum disease.

At 50, you may struggle with dry mouth. This can result from hormonal changes or some medications you may be taking. Therefore, take lots of water to stimulate saliva production and eliminate food particles from your teeth and gums. Chewing sugar-free gum can also offer the same benefits.

Final Thoughts

At age 50 and beyond, you’ll be at a higher risk of developing dental issues like bad breath, gum disease, cavities, tooth loss, and discoloration. Dental health-related illnesses like oral cancer are also common at this stage. In this article, you’ve learned that taking care of your teeth and gums can significantly improve your dental health at age 50 and beyond. So, get dentures or implants in case of missing teeth, and ensure daily brushing and flossing. Drinking lots of water and going for regular oral check-ups can also help. These steps will help you maintain optimal oral health at age 50 and as you get older.

Continue Reading

Trending

error: Content is protected !!