Connect with us

Tech

EV charging solutions to cope with high electricity prices in Europe

Published

on

EV charging solutions to cope with high electricity prices in Europe

The intensifying war in Ukraine is sparking an energy crisis in Europe, with everyone witnessing unfathomable increases in electricity prices. And there are no signs that the energy crisis will improve anytime soon, as Russia says it will not fully restore gas supplies to Europe until Western sanctions are lifted. In such an environment, electric vehicle charging station operators and consumers face a brutal winter.

Tesla raise European Supercharger rates

Tesla has sent an email to European owners in which the company warns of another massive price increase coming to Superchargers. In the email, Tesla blamed rising energy prices in Europe for the current price hike.

In Germany, Supercharger rates are climbing to 69 to 71 cents per kilowatt hour, according to Teslamag. The previous prices of 56 to 58 cents per kWh have been effective since May. That represents a premium of about 23 percent. Compared to the 0.37 euros/kWh charged until August 2021, the current rates of up to 71 cents represent a price increase of almost 92 percent. At the same time, the price for third-party electric cars at the Supercharger rose to 80 to 82 cents, up from 70 to 71 cents previously.

Allego and Shell Recharge again raise charging prices

Tesla is not alone on this route. In Europe, Allego announced a further price increase for its charging stations on 7 October – although the previous price round only took place on 1 September. In Germany, Shell Recharge is already increasing its rates at the end of the month.

In Germany, the kilowatt-hour price at the company’s own AC charging points will rise from 47 to 60 cents from 7 October. For DC charging up to 50 kW, 75 cents per kilowatt hour will be charged at Allego from the effective date (previously 70 cents). For DC chargers with more than 50 kW, the kWh price will rise from 75 to 80 cents. By comparison, before the current price round, DC charging with more than 50 kW was possible for 68 cents, while AC charging cost 43 cents per kWh from January 2022 until the end of August in Germany.

integrated solution of solar+energy storage+charging

SETEC POWER officially launched the integrated solution of solar+energy storage+charging under the combination of industry trends and customer suggestions. This integrated system consists of two parts: solar panel and controller + energy storage system + EV charger. The solar panel is pre-mounted, requiring only simple mounting bracket screws for use. Another part of the system combines the controller, energy storage system, and EV charger in a single enclosure, maximizing installation space and cost savings.

SETEC POWER’s new solution is now the perfect choice to cope with soaring European electricity prices. For charging station operators, the solar charging solution reduces operating costs significantly and allows excess electricity to be sold using a battery storage system. For individual households, our solar charging solution not only reduces the cost of charging electric vehicles but also allows the stored excess power to be used to meet the needs of the household grid.

European countries are considering reforming their energy markets. However, it is unlikely that fundamental changes will be pushed through in time to help this winter. If you’re struggling to charge your electric car, consider SETEC POWER, a solar solution.

Tech

What Are the Different Types of Water Heaters That Exist Today?

Published

on

What Are the Different Types of Water Heaters That Exist Today?

Did you know that water heating accounts for as much as 20% of your household energy use? And that figure grows the longer you stay in that nice hot shower!

Of course, the types of water heaters you choose can also increase (or reduce) your that figure. Once upon a time, people just had a simple hot water tank heated by a fuel of some kind. Today, there’s a surprisingly extensive range of water heaters to choose from, and knowing which is best for your home can be daunting.

If you’re upgrading your current heater or choosing appliances for a new build, diving into the pros and cons of each machine is essential. Below, we explore it all. So read on!

What Is a Water Heater?

Before you can find the best water heater for your home, you need to understand what a water heater is and does!

Believe it or not, but the is right there in the name: a water heater is an appliance that heats the water in your home, which you then use to wash dishes, clean your body, and wash your clothes–among other activities.

Before the 1890s or so, Americans had to heat their water in an enormous metal bucket atop their wood-burning stoves. Then, they’d carry it over, bucket by bucket, to fill a bathtub in the kitchen.

Today, we’re far luckier–we have water heaters and indoor plumbing to do the job for us.

How a Water Heater Works

Now we’ve cleared that up, let’s explore how a residential water heater does what it does. While there are many types of water heaters (more on those later), they all work in similar ways.

First, water is fed into a tank or runs through a pipe. Then, the water is heated slowly (in the case of the tank) or rapidly (in the case of the pipe) until it reaches a pre-determined temperature. Then, when you turn on the hot tap anywhere in your home, the water leaves the tank or runs through the pipes, arriving in the sink or shower hot.

Water heaters mostly used to function on electricity, but now you can run water heaters on gas, solar, and even the hot air from your attic!

If you need a water heater replacement, that’s usually a plumber’s job. But, unfortunately, it’s also typically a significant expense!

Types of Water Heaters: Explained

Let’s say your current water heater has broken down, and you’re in the market for a new one. If you’re a smart homeowner, you’ll look into all the standard options available today rather than just buying a replica of what you already had.

Conventional

Almost every homeowner will be familiar with a conventional or tank-style water heater when it comes to homeownership. If you didn’t have one in the house you bought, you almost certainly grew up with one in the house.

This water heater has a tank that fills with water. The tank has two valves:

  • A temperature control valve, which releases at 120 F
  • A pressure control valve, which releases at 150 PSI

The water in the tank is constantly re-heated to stay at the desired temperature. Then, the hot water is piped all over the house as needed.

Tank water heaters come in various capacities depending on your budget, how it’s powered, and the size of your home (namely, how many places in your house need hot water).

Tankless

Some homes (especially new homes) have a tankless water heater installed.

As soon as you turn on the hot tap, the coils in the water heater are filled with water. Next, an element heats the coils, which heats the water. It’s the instantaneous result that people love about these water heaters.

In most cases, this type of heater is powered by gas. If they’re run on electricity, they might not be as efficient and may raise your utility bills more than you’d like.

Tankless water heaters are great for homes using a small amount of hot water, like condos or apartments. However, larger homes requiring larger volumes of water might get tepid rather than hot water coming out of the tap.

They also require a certain level of water pressure to function effectively.

Hybrid or Heat Pump

If you’re looking for ways to lower your utility bills (and who isn’t these days), consider a hybrid water heater.

This type of heater uses the heat from the ground and the air to heat water. It only uses electricity to transfer the heat to the water, rather than using it to heat the water itself, saving energy.

This type of water heater is typically quite significant because it features a pump on the top of the appliance. This means you need a decent amount of ceiling clearance to install it in your home.

And while it’s relatively inexpensive to run and easy to maintain, it has a higher upfront cost than most other types of water heaters.

Solar

A water heater option to emerge in the past decade or so is the solar-power water heater. This option is excellent for those considering adding solar panels to their home and perfect for anyone who already has them!

You need to connect your water tank to solar panels installed on your roof to get hot water. The energy from the sun is transferred to the tank via a closed-loop system made of heat-conductive material. It’s this that heats the water in the tank.

Just remember that while solar is beneficial (and cost-saving) in most parts of America, areas with low sunlight hours might not get the return on investment they were expecting.

Get the Steamy Bathroom of Your Dreams

Whether you’re happy to stay on the grid or excited to embrace the eco-friendly age, there are types of water heaters to suit.

Environmentalists can choose between solar-powered water heaters and heat-pump or hybrid options. Traditionalists or those in areas with low sunlight hours can stick with a conventional water heater or go for a tankless model. What’s essential is that you do your research on how each option meets your needs and shop around for the best prices.

For more advice on everything household related, browse the other articles on our website.

Continue Reading

Trending